University of California, Riverside

Earth Sciences

Department of Earth Sciences



In Memoriam: Harry W. Green


Harry W. Green

Distinguished Professor of Geology and Geophysics

Ph.D., Univ. of California, Los Angeles, 1968

Harry earned his PhD in 1968, working with David T. Griggs (one of the fathers of rock mechanics) at the University of California, Los Angeles. He completed his postdoctoral work in the Division of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Case Western Reserve University, and then in 1970 began his long career as a professor in the University of California System, first at Davis and then at Riverside.

Harry was known worldwide as one of the giants in the field of high-temperature/high pressure mineralogy and petrology, and was a scientist of unparalleled energy, enthusiasm and vision. His vision and interests were as broad as they were deep, and he relished taking on big problems with fresh approaches, drawing upon his prodigious memory of interesting items he had encountered in the past, be they an intriguing paper or a curious feature in an outcrop.

He was exceptional in his ability to move between natural samples and the laboratory, from developing insight into the deep origins of xenoliths from the tiniest inclusions, to developing new instrumentation with which to conduct high-pressure deformation studies. He could see the big picture implication of the tiniest microstructure. This talent was evidenced by his experimental investigations of high-pressure phase transformations and their relation to the problem of the mechanism for deep focus earthquakes. His lab was a hub for international research, and many in the community either were trained or worked as guests in his facilities. He was a generous collaborator who worked with many researchers across the solid earth sciences from seismology to metamorphic petrology. He was as unselfish in service to his community as he was open to scientific collaborations.

His service to the scientific community was extremely wide-ranging, including serving as Chairman of the Executive Committee of the Consortium for Materials Properties Research in Earth Sciences (COMPRES), and serving as President of the Tectonophysics Section and member of the Governing Council of the American Geophysical Union (AGU). A Fellow of the Mineralogical Society of America, AGU, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Harry was awarded the Bowen Award from AGU and the Roebling Medal by the Mineralogical Society of America, among many other honors, awards, and lectureships.

Harry served the University of California in many capacities. In 1992, after serving as chair of the Geology Department at UC Davis, Harry moved to Riverside and became the Director of the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP) at UCR. He then became Vice Chancellor for Research, serving with distinction for 5 years. During his tenure as VCR, among the many improvements he implemented, was a new process which greatly facilitated grant applications by the faculty.

Harry was a strong believer in shared governance within the University of California. He served the Academic Senate in numerous ways, including chairing the Committee on Undergraduate Education, sitting on the Committee on Academic Personnel (CAP) at UCR. He chaired UCAP at the State-Wide Senate for two years and was instrumental in changing APM210-1.d to become more inclusive. He was a staunch advocate for increasing faculty diversity at UC. For his service to the Senate and campus at large, he received the Distinguished Campus Service Award. For his contributions to his field of science, he received the Faculty Research Lecturer Award, the highest award bestowed upon the faculty at UC.

Harry was an inspiring teacher who went beyond the call of duty to ensure that his students learned and developed strong critical thinking skills. But Harry was more than a world-class scientist and teacher, he was a wonderful human being. He was fair and kind, and his integrity was unparalleled. He was known for his generosity of spirit, going above and beyond for countless colleagues and friends. He travelled the world many times over, loved to tell stories, and his wry sense of humor endeared him to everyone he met. But more than anything, Harry was a loving husband, father and grandfather. He is survived by his wife Manuela Martins-Green, also a professor at UC Riverside, as well as his children and grandchildren.

-Kathryn Uhrich, Dean, College of Natural and Agricultural Sciences

More Information

General Campus Information

University of California, Riverside
900 University Ave.
Riverside, CA 92521
Tel: (951) 827-1012

UCR LibrariesCampus Status
Career OpportunitiesDiversity
Visit UCRMaps and Directions

Earth Sciences Information

Department of Earth Sciences
Geology Building

Tel: (951) 827-3434
Fax: (951) 827-4324
E-mail: john.herring@ucr.edu

Footer